Skip to main content
Activity - Show and Tell: Discovering Texas Moving Image History in Your Community (Gr 7-12)
DOWNLOAD the new Lesson Plan here.
About the Lesson
Videos
Hook - Media Discussion
Activity
After the Assignment
Resources
TEKS

From Edison's turn of the century kinetoscopes to modern-day streaming video on the Internet, moving images have recorded history, provided entertainment, documented daily life, and informed us about our communities and the world. When discussing film and video, we often first think of Hollywood films and national television, but there are numerous other types of moving images that provide us with important historical information about our lives, communities, and cultures. In this activity, students will discover a piece of film or video in their community and present it to the class. This activity targets TEKS objectives in Social Studies Grades 7 through 8, United States History Studies Since 1877, and Social Studies Research Methods.

Teacher and students discuss film and video as a source of historical information using the TAMI video library and the TAMI Guide to Moving Image Genres, making sure to address home movies. The end result of the conversation should be an understanding of the different types of film and video that exists outside of Hollywood feature films and nationally-produced television. Suggested discussion questions:

  • What kind of moving images do we encounter on a day to day basis?
  • What kind of moving images have you (the student) encountered in the last few days?
  • What information can moving images give us?
  • Why might a home movie be a source of historical information?
  • What kind of information might be unique to home movies?
  • Would a home movie be considered a primary or secondary resource?
  • How would an archival film, like those on the TAMI website be different from moving images we normally encounter?

The activity can be done individually or in groups.

Students are asked to select a 1 minute segment from a home movie or other local film and present the film to the class in a show-and-tell method. If students are unsure if their family has home movies, they can also inquire with their extended family, neighbors, and friends for materials. They can also choose a film-produced by the school or a school media class, a film or video from a local library/archive or a film from TAMI’s video library. The teacher should specify the formats that can be played in the classroom. Students should investigate and answer to the best of their abilities:

  • Who produced the film?
  • Who was the intended audience?
  • Where was the film shot? When was the film shot?
  • What is happening in the film?
  • Why might this be of historical interest?
  • How is this film representing the culture of the producer or the place, person, or thing being filmed?
  • How does this film represent the landscape, community, region, state, or country where it was filmed?
  • How does it represent the producer’s community, region, state or country?

Optional: Have students present their information on the film by creating a brochure that other students can go over while the film is played. Brochures should be clear and informative but not overly wordy or cumbersome.

Have students take notes on the films presented and then write a response paper using the following scenario.

  • A Texas history archive has contacted your school looking for films to include in three new exhibits. The first exhibit features moving images shot in the state of Texas. The second is an exhibit of moving images filmed by Texans while in other states or countries. The third features moving images from people who recently relocated to Texas showing the traditions and cultures they brought with them. Write a letter to the museum advocating for the inclusion of three films from the presentation that would fit into these three categories. If you are unable to find a film for each exhibit, propose an additional exhibit and the inclusion of a film that would be representative.

The Texas Archive of the Moving Image is constantly taking submissions for its online library of Texas-related film and video. Submit copies of the fictional proposals to info@texasarchive.org for possible inclusion in the site. A TAMI representative will reply with more details on participating.

Social Studies Grade 7
 
19A - Explain how the diversity of Texas is reflected in a variety of cultural activities, celebrations, and performances
 
21A - Differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about Texas
 
21B - Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalization and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions
 
22C - Transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate
 
22D - Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information
 
Social Studies Grade 8
 
29A - Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about the United States
 
29B - Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalization and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions
 
30C - Transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate
 
30D - Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information
 
United States History Studies Since 1877
 
29A - Use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions 
 
29B - Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalization and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions
 
29D - Use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence
 
30A - Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information
 
World Geography Studies
 
16A - Describe the distinctive cultural patterns and landscapes associated with different places in Texas, the United States, and other regions of the world, and how these patterns influenced the processes of innovation and diffusion.
 
21A - Analyze and evaluate the validity and utility of multiple sources of geographic information such as primary and secondary sources, aerial photographs, and maps
 
Social Studies Research Methods
 
2C - Collect information from a variety of sources (primary, secondary, written, and oral) using techniques such as questionnaires, interviews, and library research
 
2D - Use current technologies such as library topic catalogues, networks, on-line information systems, academic journals, primary sources in the Internet, email interviews, and video interviews to collect information about a selected topic
 
2H - Describe the results of the research process
 
Introspective Cage