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Vietnam's Future - Hawaiian Parley Affirms U.S. Aims
The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
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  • Highlights
    President Johnson meets with officials from Saigon
    The president sits in on a meeting with other officials
    Vice President Humphrey awaits President Johnson's arrival in Los Angeles
    The president holds a press conference
  • Transcript
    A three-day summit meeting between U.S. and South Vietnam leaders was aimed at bringing a new social and economic perspective to the war in Vietnam.
    President Johnson flew to Hawaii for the talks with the officials from Saigon, and at the conclusion of the conference with Prime Minister Ky left and chief of state too, issued a Declaration of Honolulu.
    The meeting was called to clarify U.S. commitments and to resolve the confusion on South Vietnam's future.
    While the Asian and American leaders remain far apart on some facets of the war, they did agree that social reforms must follow quickly on military victory. 
    Premier Ky wants the bombing of North Vietnam stepped up; the U.S. does not.
    The U.S. wants the communist Vietcong to sit in on peace negotiations when they come; Premier Key does not.
    However, the summation of the declaration calls for these joint aims: to defend against aggression, to work for social revolution, to aim for free self government, to attack hunger, ignorance, and disease, and to search unendingly for peace.
    The meeting breaks up in an atmosphere of new and closer cooperation in South Vietnam.
    Meanwhile in Los Angeles, Vice President Humphrey awaits Mr. Johnson's return to the mainland.
    The President had already alerted Mr. Humphrey that the Vice President was to leave for Southeast Asia on a firsthand survey of economic reforms that could be put into effect immediately.
    The presidential jet no sooner rolls to a stop then the two men hold a briefing session aboard the plane, and then an impromptu press conference. 
    The president makes the formal announcement of Mr. Humphrey's mission and then Mr. Johnson sums up the aims outlined in the Declaration of Honolulu. 
    [Johnson]: And we shall fight the battle against aggression in Vietnam to a successful conclusion. We shall fight the battle for social construction and throughout the world we shall fight the battle for peace. 
    And to the American people, who have given us their strength in every hour of trial, I say to you that we shall fight all of these battles successfully, and we shall prevail.