Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

Governor Connally Speaks about President Kennedy’s Assassination, Part I (1965)

Gordon Wilkison

Sound | 1965

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2013_02237_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texasarchive-flash.streamguys.com:80/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2013 02237 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
TAMI Tags
  •  Connally describes what he thinks about when the assassination is mentioned 
  •  Connally talks about the lingering injury from the bullet wound he received the day Kennedy was killed 
  •  Connally describes how the assassination has changed his life 
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
  • About the video
  • John Connally John Connally
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
This interview footage captures scenes of Texas Governor John Connallly speaking about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and his experience following the tragedy. Governor Connally discusses what he thinks about when asked about the assassination, his continuing injury from his gunshot wound, and how the assassination has changed his life.
The thirty-eighth Texas State Governor, John Bowden Connally Jr., was born on a farm near Floresville, Texas, on February 27, 1917. Connally graduated from the University of Texas in 1941 with a law degree and was subsequently admitted to the State Bar of Texas. He began his political career as a legislative assistant to Representative Lyndon B. Johnson in 1939. The two retained a close but often torrid friendship until LBJ’s death. After returning from U.S. Naval combat in the Pacific Theater, Connally joined an influential Austin law firm, served as LBJ’s campaign manager and aide, and became oil tycoon Sid W. Richardson’s legal counsel. Connally’s reputation as a political mastermind was solidified after managing five of LBJ’s major political campaigns, including the 1964 presidential election. In 1961, Connally served as Secretary of the Navy under President John F. Kennedy.
 
Wealthy financiers like Sid Richardson and a strong grass-roots network of supporters helped Connally win his first gubernatorial election in 1962. The three-term governor fought to expand higher education by increasing teachers’ salaries, creating new doctoral programs, and establishing the Texas Commission on the Arts and the Texas Historical Commission. In 1969, President Richard Nixon appointed Connally to the foreign-intelligence advisory board. He was named the sixty-first Secretary of Treasury in 1971. Connally became one of the President’s principal advisors and headed the Democrats for Nixon organization, finally switching to the Republican Party in 1973. Connally is also remembered nationally for being in the car with President Kennedy during his assasination in Dallas in 1963, when Connally received wounds in his chest, wrist, and thigh. 
 
The former Texas governor announced in January 1979 that he would seek the Republican presidential nomination. His campaign was abandoned after media attacks over a controversial public speech and bank partnership. Financial troubles befell Connally by the mid 1980s after a real estate development partnership with former Texas Representative Ben Barnes collapsed. John Connally died on June 15, 1993 and is interred at the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. 
 
1960s
1960’s
interview
interviews
interviewing
Dallas
Dallas County
Gordon Wilkison
Wilkison, Gordon
KTBC
television
TV
John Connally
John Bowden Connally, Jr.
Connally, John
Connally, John Bowden
Governor John Connally
Governor Connally
John F. Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Fitzgerald “Jack” Kennedy
JFK
J.F.K.
President John F. Kennedy
President Kennedy
Kennedy, John F.
Kennedy, John Fitzgerald
President
President of the United States
assassinate
assassinates
assassinated
assassination
murder
murdered
murders
crime
death
fatal
injury
injuries
shot
shots
shoot
shoots
shooting
Dealey Plaza
Texas School Book Depository
downtown
Lee Harvey Oswald
Oswald, Lee Harvey
crowd
crowds
audience
platform
event
events
Lyndon Baines Johnson
Johnson, Lyndon
Johnson, Lyndon B.
Johnson, Lyndon Baines
L.B.J.
LBJ
Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon Johnson
President Johnson
President LBJ
President Lyndon B. Johnson
President Lyndon Johnson
Jacqueline Lee "Jackie" Bouvier Kennedy
Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy
Jacqueline Kennedy
Jackie Kennedy
Jackie O
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis
Kennedy, Jacqueline Lee Bouvier
Kennedy, Jacqueline
Kennedy, Jackie
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy
Onassis, Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis
family
wife
wives
First Lady
First Lady of the United States
lunch
luncheon
freeway
gun
guns
rifle
rifles
bullet
bullets
wound
wounds
Nellie Connally
Idanell Brill "Nellie" Connally
First Lady of Texas
Connally, Nellie
Connally, Idanell Brill
Idanell Brill Connally
hospital
Parkland Hospital
visit
visits
visiting
visitation
revisit
revisits
revisiting
trauma
traumas
traumatic
post-traumatic
noise
hunt
hunts
hunting
Secret Service
law enforcement