Texas Archive of the Moving Image is loading...

Cactus Pryor Compilation Reel

Cactus and Peggy Davis Pryor

Sound | 1960s

comment
  • Normal
  • Large video
  • Large content
  • Full video
"rtmpconf":{ type:"flv", file:"mp4:2012_03549_480x360.mp4", baseUrl:wgScriptPath + "/extensions/player/", streamServer:'texasarchive-flash.streamguys.com:80/vod', width:"480", height:"360", config:{ showBrowserControls:false }, poster:"/library/index.php?action=ajax%26rs=importImage%26rsargs[]=2012 03549 tn.jpg%26rsargs[]=480", controls:{ _timerStyle:"sides" } }
Map
Loading Google Maps...
 
TAMI Tags
  •  Judge Wilmer Garwood 
  •  Housekeeping Columnist Heloise 
  •  Governor John Connally 
  •  Carol Channing 
  •  Walter Cronkite 
  •  Dan Blocker 
  •  Longhorn Head Coach Darrel K Royal 
  •  Bauer House, Austin, TX 
  •  Frank Erwin making a cameo as groundskeeper 
  •  Ralph Yarborough 
  •  Governor John Connally 
  •  Governor Preston Smith presenting award to actress Agnes Moorehead 
  •  Rooster Andrews 
  •  Governor Preston Smith 
  •  Ben Barnes 
  •  Governor Preston Smith 
  •  Eva Gabor and Ben Barnes leaving Headliners Club 
  •  Willie Kocurek 
  •  Governor Preston Smith 
 
Mark Video Segment:
begin
end
play
See someone or something you recognize? TAMI Tagging
Click begin and end to mark the segment you wish
to tag. Then enter your comment and click on Tag!
To: tamitags@texasarchive.org
 
Share this video
X

Send E-mail

Embed

[Hide]Right click this link, select 'open in new tab', and add to bookmarks:
In partnership with:
  • About the video
  • Cactus Pryor Cactus Pryor
  • John Connally John Connally
  • Walter Cronkite Walter Cronkite
  • Texas Locations
  • Keywords
This compilation reel contains varied scenes from news stories and Cactus Pryor’s career. Of note is Cactus as toastmaster at a dinner honoring housewife advice columnist, Heloise, where he takes off his toupee; the Headliners Club Awards ceremony in 1967 with John Connally and Carol Channing; Governor Preston Smith presenting an Honorary Texan Citizenship to actress Agnes Moorehead; actress and socialite Eva Gabor leaving the Headliners Club of Austin with Ben Barnes in 1973; a spoof of Preston Smith blowing up Ben Barnes’ campaign train, possibly as Barnes was running for governor; a humorous commercial for Austin service station, Willie Kocurek Co.; and a photo retrospective of Cactus Pryor’s career that captures the TV personality with many famous faces. Note, censor bars added by the archive to allow viewing by a mixed audience.
Richard S. "Cactus" Pryor was a comedic television and broadcast personality from Austin, Texas. Cactus, an Austin native, was born in 1923, straight into the entertainment business. His father owned the Cactus Theater on Congress Avenue (hence the nickname), and starting at just 3 years old, Cactus made stage appearances before the shows began. Cactus attended the University of Texas and served in the US Army Air Corp. When he returned to Austin from his service in 1944, Cactus joined the broadcasting team at Lady Bird Johnson's KLBJ radio station, where he worked until 2008. He joined the world of broadcast television at KTBC in 1951 where he was program manager and hosted a variety of television programs, including a football program with Darrell K Royal and many celebrity interviews. Cactus appeared in two films with his friend John Wayne, Hellfighters and The Green Berets. Throughout the 1960s and 70s, he became a sought-after speaker and event host, famous for his roasts of entertainers and politicians, most of whom he counted as close friends. Cactus was also known for his disguises. He would appear at functions in character, often pulling a fast one on the crowd as he charmed them first in disguise, then again as he revealed himself and used his earlier conversations to entertain the crowd. As an active member of the Headliners Club of Austin, Pryor starred in many humorous television news satires alongside Texas politicians, some of which can be seen in his film collection, as well as the Gordon Wilkison Collection and the Wallace and Euna Pryor Collection  He was nationally-known, but kept Austin his home, helping put the city on the map in the 60s and 70s. Cactus Pryor announced to his KLBJ listeners in 2007 that he had Alzheimer's disease, and Austin's "original funnyman" died in 2011.
The thirty-eighth Texas State Governor, John Bowden Connally Jr., was born on a farm near Floresville, Texas, on February 27, 1917. Connally graduated from the University of Texas in 1941 with a law degree and was subsequently admitted to the State Bar of Texas. He began his political career as a legislative assistant to Representative Lyndon B. Johnson in 1939. The two retained a close but often torrid friendship until LBJ’s death. After returning from U.S. Naval combat in the Pacific Theater, Connally joined an influential Austin law firm, served as LBJ’s campaign manager and aide, and became oil tycoon Sid W. Richardson’s legal counsel. Connally’s reputation as a political mastermind was solidified after managing five of LBJ’s major political campaigns, including the 1964 presidential election. In 1961, Connally served as Secretary of the Navy under President John F. Kennedy.
 
Wealthy financiers like Sid Richardson and a strong grass-roots network of supporters helped Connally win his first gubernatorial election in 1962. The three-term governor fought to expand higher education by increasing teachers’ salaries, creating new doctoral programs, and establishing the Texas Commission on the Arts and the Texas Historical Commission. In 1969, President Richard Nixon appointed Connally to the foreign-intelligence advisory board. He was named the sixty-first Secretary of Treasury in 1971. Connally became one of the President’s principal advisors and headed the Democrats for Nixon organization, finally switching to the Republican Party in 1973. Connally is also remembered nationally for being in the car with President Kennedy during his assasination in Dallas in 1963, when Connally received wounds in his chest, wrist, and thigh. 
 
The former Texas governor announced in January 1979 that he would seek the Republican presidential nomination. His campaign was abandoned after media attacks over a controversial public speech and bank partnership. Financial troubles befell Connally by the mid 1980s after a real estate development partnership with former Texas Representative Ben Barnes collapsed. John Connally died on June 15, 1993 and is interred at the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. 
 
Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. was an American broadcast journalist, best known as anchorman for the CBS Evening News for 19 years. Cronkite was born on November 4, 1916 in St. Joseph, Missouri, but spent much of his youth in Houston. He worked on the newspaper at San Jacinto High School, then on the Daily Texan at the University of Texas, which he attended for two years before leaving to take a job as a radio announcer in Oklahoma  City.  In 1939 he joined the United Press and became a war correspondent with the outbreak of World War II.  Edward R. Murrow asked him to join his team in 1943, but Cronkite elected to stay on with the United Press.
 
Following the war, Murrow finally convinced Cronkite to join CBS. He first gained prominence at CBS with his coverage of the 1952 Democratic and Republican National Conventions. He took over Edward R. Murrow’s position as the senior correspondent at CBS in 1961, and he began anchoring the CBS Evening News in 1962. In 1963, the program was extended to a half-hour and renamed the “CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite,” as it remained until his retirement in 1981.
 
Throughout his career he signed off of programs with a trademark phrase. In the 1950s, he closed programs by asking, “What sort of day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times. And you were there.” For decades at the helm of the CBS Evening News, he simply concluded, “And that’s the way it is.” 
 
Walter Cronkite is remembered as an impartial, trustworthy presence in primetime news. He covered some of the most significant American events of the 20th century, including the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr., the moon landing, and the Vietnam War.  Cronkite is perhaps best remembered as the man that told America about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He broke the news on CBS, the first network to report the event, so most Americans first heard the grave news about their president from him.
 
Cronkite married Betsy Maxwell in 1940, and they remained married until her death in 2005. They had three children: Nancy, Kathy, and Walter the 3rd. Cronkite continued to be a prominent voice in journalism even after his retirement. He died on July 17, 2009. His papers are held at the University of Texas, and the Moody College of Communication named the Walter Cronkite Plaza in his honor. 
 
TFC
Richard S. “Cactus” Pryor
Cactus Pryor
Richard S. Pryor
Richard Pryor
Richard “Cactus” Pryor
Heloise
Happy Hints for Housewives
Heloise’s Housekeeping Hints
Heloise Bowles Cruse
Eloise Bowles Cruse
Eloise Bowles
housewife
housewives
column
columnist
book
author
honoree
housekeeping
dinner
toastmaster
Judge Garwood
Wilmer Garwood
Wilmer St. John Garwood
bald
toupée
toupee
toupees
1963
John Connally
Governor John Connally
governor
Governor Connally
John Bowden Connally, Jr.
Headliners Club
1967
award
awards
Carol Channing
Carol Elaine Channing
launder
laundry
laundering
organ
beer
politician
model
lingerie
Walter Cronkite
Dan Blocker
judge
court
bench
centerfold
Darrel K Royal
Darrell Royal
Darrell K. Royal
DKR
Coach Darrell K Royal
coach
head coach
football
University of Texas
University of Texas at Austin
Texas Longhorns
Longhorns
Bauer House
tour
tours
Chancellor
Tarrytown
Charles "Mickey" LeMaistre
groundskeeper
landscaping
speaking
speech
Ralph Yarborough
Ralph Webster Yarborough
Agnes Moorehead
actress
honorary
Texan
Preston Smith
Governor Preston Smith
ceremony
Rooster Andrews
Ben Barnes
campaign
Zilker Park
explosives
dynamite
explosion
train
railroad
railway
ride
spoof
Benny Frank Barnes
state official
Eva Gabor
1973
Willie Kocurek Co.
Willi Kocurek
Zorro
horse
horseback
tribute
memorial
photo
montage
childhood
career
family
college
military
Fess Parker
James Stewart
Jimmy Stewart
Raquel Welch
John Wayne
Carol Burnett
Jack Valenti
Lucille Ball
Lady Bird Johnson
Claudia Alta "Lady Bird" Taylor Johnson
Chris Evert
Donna Axum
Helen Hayes
Kirk Douglas
Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon Johnson
LBJ
L.B.J.
President Lyndon Johnson
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Don Knotts
Zsa Zsa Gabor
Ann-Margaret
Sonny
Sonny Bono
Cher
Ronald Reagan
Ronald Wilson Reagan
President Reagan
Kingston Trio
Hubert Humphrey
Chet Huntley
Joe E. Brown